Dades generals

Curs acadèmic:
2017
Descripció:
...
Crèdits:
6

Grups

Grup A

Durada:
Semestral, 1r semestre
Professorat:
NATALIA FERRER ROCA  / JAUME - OSCAR GUÍA JULVE  / JAUME MARIN RABIOL
Idioma de les classes:
Anglès (100%)

Altres Competències

  • Understand sustainable management principles
  • Apply environmental, economic and social quality and management systems
  • Apply economic and finance management systems to tourism development
  • Apply planning tools
  • Understand policies which affect a tourist destination
  • Understand the fundamentals and apply suitable scientific methodologies
  • Define priorities within the objectives specified
  • Apply knowledge and skills in new or unfamiliar areas and in multi-disciplinary contexts relative to specific fields
  • Make decisions and solve problems
  • Interpret and critically evaluate results found
  • Work within a context of social responsibility
  • Read, understand and analyze scientific texts
  • Communicate effectively, both orally and in written form
  • Analyze complex situations and plan strategies for their resolution, both individually and in a group
  • Use Information Technologies
  • Use the English language

Continguts

1. COURSE CONTENT This course will introduce students to three main areas of focus: innovation, entrepreneurship, and new product development, with emphasis on new product development in tourism. Main Contents: I. Destination product development 1. Destination product & tourism area life cycle 2. Destination product development activities: physical & human development, packaging, programming, and destination interpretation & tourist information 3. Destination product strategies: diversification, quality, sustainability and accessibility II. Destination product marketing 1. Destination markets and segments’ behaviour: destination market segments and their behaviour regarding motivations and destination selection 2. Destination promotion (non-digital and digital marketing strategies and practices) The course will include a few readings, lectures & discussion, a field trip, tutorials for discussion, an assignment to be written and submitted, and an oral presentation & discussion of the findings.

Activitats

Tipus d’activitat Hores amb professor Hores sense professor Total
Anàlisi / estudi de casos 65 85 150
Total 65 85 150

Bibliografia

  • BUTLER, R. W. (1980). The concept of a tourist area cycle of evolution. Implications for management of. Canadian Geographer, (24), 5-12 Catàleg
  • CALS, J. (Director), CAPELLÀ, J. i VAQUÉ, E. (1997). Gestió Pública del Turisme. Manual per a les administracions locals del es zones. Barcelona: Fundació Carles Pi i Sunyer d'Estudis Autonòmics i Locals. Catàleg
  • DONAIRE, J. A. i MUNDET, Ll. (2002). Estrategias de reconversión turística de los municipios litorales catalanes. Papers de Turisme, (29), 50-65 Catàleg
  • LOPEZ PALOMEQUE, F. (2004). La gestión pública del turismo en Cataluña. Organizació y Política Turistica de. Investigaciones Geográficas, (34), 5-27 Catàleg
  • NOGUE, J. (1989). Paisaje y Turismo. Estudios Turísticos, (103), 35-45 Catàleg
  • PEARCE, D. (1997). Tourism and the Autonomous Communities in Spain. Annals of Tourism Research, 25(1), 156-177 Catàleg
  • PLOG, S. C. (1974). Why destination areas rise and fall in popularity?. The Cornell H. R. A. Quarterly,, 55-58 Catàleg
  • PRIESTLEY, G. K. i MUNDET, Ll. (1998). The post-stagnation phase of the resort cycle. Annals of Tourism Research, 25(1), 85-111 Catàleg
  • STIGLITZ, J. E. (2002). The Economics of the Public Sector. W.W. Norton, cop 2000 (3º ed). A. Bosch.. Catàleg
  • TURNER, L. i ASH, J. (1991). La horda dorada. Madrid: Endymion. Catàleg
  • VERA, J. F. (Coord.) (1997). Análisis territorial del turismo. Barcelona: Ariel. Catàleg
  • Reece, William S (cop. 2010 ). The Economics of tourism . Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall. Catàleg
  • Dwyer, Larry (cop. 2010 ). Tourism economics and policy . Bristol: Channel View. Catàleg
  • Bull, Adrian (1995 ). The Economics of travel and tourism (2nd ed.). Melbourne: Longman. Catàleg
  • Yeoman, Ian (cop. 2012 ). 2050 : tomorrow's tourism . Bristol: Channel View. Catàleg
  • Pocock, Naomi; McIntosh, Alison (2013). Long-Term Travellers Return, "Home"?. Annals of Tourism Research, 42(), 402-424. Recuperat , a http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160738313000376
  • Rosh White, Naomi; B. White, Peter (2007). Home and Away: Tourists in a Connected World. Annals of Tourism Research, 34(1), 88-104. Recuperat , a http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016073830600096X
  • Pearce, L. Philip (2012). The experience of visiting home and familiar places. Annals of Tourism Research, 39(2), 1024-1047. Recuperat , a http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160738311001988
  • Caletrío, Javier (2011). Tourism, landscape change and critical thresholds. Annals of Tourism Research, 38(1), 313-316. Recuperat , a http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160738310000836
  • Abdelati, B. & Bramwell, B. (2015). Tourism product development and product diversification in destinations. Tourism Management, 50(), 213-224. Recuperat , a http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tourman.2015.02.005 Catàleg
  • Morrison, Alastair M (2013 ). Marketing and managing tourism destinations . New York: Routledge. Catàleg

Avaluació i qualificació

Activitats d'avaluació:

Descripció de l'activitat Avaluació de l'activitat %
You will work with a group of 4 students throughout the course applying the concepts learned in the course to a real case of destination product development and marketing. Your objective is to find out, understand and assess the destination product development & marketing strategies and practices, and prepare a compelling and well-thought report on them; and what modifications and improvements can be suggested after having assessed the strategies and visited the destination. A representative of the destination might be present in the presentation. Presentations and discussion: 60 %
Project Paper: 40 %
Note: Oral presentation is more weighted in the final mark because it has been considered that, nowadays, if you have to play the role of tourism officers working in the public sector you have to be able to effectively present your points to the politicians in charge of your area, that is, going straight to the point with clear proposals.
50
Individual evaluation
There will be plenty of time for you to contribute to class discussions or during the field trip activities. You’ll be graded based on your attendance and the quality of your contribution, not the amount of time you demand in the discussion. This means coming to class or to the field trip thoroughly familiar with the assigned readings and, therefore, prepared to raise questions, to open discussion, to identify topics of interest in the reading, and actively engage other students in the discussion.
In-class contribution is an important part of our shared learning experience. Your active participation helps me to evaluate your overall performance. You can excel in this area if you come to class on time and contribute to the course in class or during the field trips by:
- Providing evidence of having thought through the material.
- Advancing the discussion by contributing insightful comments and questions.
- Listening attentively in class.
- Demonstrating interest in your peers' comments, questions, and presentations.
- Giving constructive feedback to your peers when appropriate.
20
Field trip 30 % of the mark

Because of the importance of getting to know first hand experiences and real case studies, attendance to the field trip will be compulsory.
30

Qualificació

PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR THIS COURSE
Attendance
Class attendance is essential to your success in this course and is part of your grade. An excused absence can only be granted in cases of illness or family emergencies. Incompatible travel plans are considered unexcused absences. Where possible, please notify me in advance of an excused absence.
Participation
In-class contribution is an important part of our shared learning experience. Your active participation helps me to evaluate your overall performance. You can excel in this area if you come to class on time and contribute to the course in class or during the field trips by:
- Providing evidence of having thought through the material.
- Advancing the discussion by contributing insightful comments and questions.
- Listening attentively in class.
- Demonstrating interest in your peers' comments, questions, and presentations.
- Giving constructive feedback to your peers when appropriate.
Submission of assignments
Late assignments will either not be accepted or will incur a grade penalty unless due to documented serious illness or family emergency.

Classroom Norms
Arrive to class on time and stay to the end of the class period. Chronically arriving late or leaving class early is unprofessional and disruptive to the entire class. Repeated tardiness will have an impact on your grade.

Group Assignment rules
Business activities involve group effort. Consequently, learning how to work effectively in a group is a critical part of your competence building.
Every member is expected to carry an equal share of the group’s workload. As such, it is in your interest to be involved in all aspects of the project. Even if you divide the work rather than work on each piece together, you are still responsible for each part. The group project will be graded as a whole: its different components will not be graded separately.
It is recommended that each group establish ground rules early in the process to facilitate your joint work including a problem-solving process for handling conflicts. In the infrequent case where you believe that a group member is not carrying out his or her fair share of work, you are urged not to permit problems to develop to a point where they become serious. If you cannot resolve conflicts internally after your best efforts, they should be brought to my attention and I will work with you to find a resolution.
You will be asked to complete a peer evaluation form to evaluate the contribution of each of your group members (including your own contribution) at the conclusion of each project. If there is consensus that a group member did not contribute a fair share of work to the project, I will consider this feedback during grading.

Observacions

COURSE MATERIALS

This is the list of required reading materials for the course:

For the topic of destination product development:

Definition of destination product & life cycle:

Morrison, A. M (2013) Marketing and Managing Tourism Destinations. Routledge: London
Chapter 1: pages 57-60 (definition of destination product)
Chapter 5: pages 251-252 (destination product life cycle); 253-257 (DMOs involvement)

Destination product development activities:

Morrison, A. M (2013) Marketing and Managing Tourism Destinations. Routledge: London
Chapter 5: 265-283 & 285-288 (physical & human development, packaging, programming, and destination interpretation & tourist information)

Destination product strategies:

Morrison, A. M (2013) Marketing and Managing Tourism Destinations. Routledge: London
Chapter 5: 258-261, 284 & 288-289 (quality, accessibility and sustainability)

Abdelati, B. & Bramwell, B. (2015). Tourism product development and product diversification in destinations. Tourism Management, Vol.50, pp.213-224. (diversification)

For the topic on destination marketing:

Destination markets & segments’ behaviour:

Morrison, A. M (2013) Marketing and Managing Tourism Destinations. Routledge: London.
Chapter 12: pages 583-587: behavior: motivations to travel
Chapter 12: pages 588-598: behavior: destination selection

Morrison, A. M (2013) Marketing and Managing Tourism Destinations. Routledge: London.
Chapter 12: pages 599-604: segmentation criteria (trip purpose, geography, socio-demographics, psychographics, visit repetition, product-related & channel of distribution)
Chapter 12: pages 605-614: segmentation trends

Morrison, A. M (2013) Marketing and Managing Tourism Destinations. Routledge: London.
Chapter 13: pages 637-644 & 650-652, and Chapter 14: pages 678-691): main leisure travel market segments (families with children, multi-generational families, luxury markets, special interest markets, agritourism market, golf travel market, theme park travel market, VFR, adventure tourism, cruise tourism, casino gaming, culinary tourism, cultural and heritage tourism, dark tourism, health and wellness tourism, medical tourism, industrial tourism, nature-based tourism & ecotourism, religious tourism, shopping tourism, sports tourism, voluntourism, wine tourism,
Chapter 15: pages 735-738): main business travel market segments (regular business travel, business events, MICE segments)

Destination promotion:

Morrison, A. M (2013) Marketing and Managing Tourism Destinations. Routledge: London.
Chapter 10: pages 479-483, 502-505 & 490-496 (destination promotion - general)
Chapter 10: pages 497-501 & Chapter 11: pages 542-572 (digital marketing)